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Six degrees of separation, FROM Where the wild things are TO …

July 6, 2019

Book coverWell, I’ve found the solution to breaking my record of not having read one Six Degrees starting book this year: suggest a book to Kate and hope she likes it! I did, and she did, and so it is that I have read this month’s starting book, Maurice Sendak’s picture book classic, Where the wild things are. I figured it might help a few other people too who have found themselves embarrassed, month after month, like me. Haha!

I plan to have a little fun with this one, but first the formalities. The Six Degrees of Separation meme is currently run by Kate, and you can read all the rules on her blog – booksaremyfavouriteandbest.

So, here goes (on the assumption that you all know the story):

Where is Max?

Well, he went

Into the woods

of the Midnight empire,

where he went Troppo with all his wild friends.

They danced around the Cold sassy tree,

and created a rumpus throwing Big rough stones.

But, in truth, in a Nutshell shall we say,

Where they really were all the time was –

Storyland.

(Links on titles are to my posts.)

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(Those of you who can count will have noticed that I’ve cheated. There are 7 books in my chain. But, I couldn’t bear to leave any out, so I gave myself recommender’s licence and kept them all. Anyone care to take me on?!)

If not, let’s move on to my usual questions. Have you read Where the wild things are? And, regardless, what would you link to? 

42 Comments leave one →
  1. July 6, 2019 10:13 am

    You’re a bit of a cleverclogs, ST ! [grin]
    But as for only just having read “Where the Wild Things Are”… I’m bereft of words.
    Shut up.

    • July 6, 2019 10:59 am

      Oh no, you’ve misread me M-R. I first read this back in 1974. I meant that people who’ve been embarrassed like me in the past for not having read the opening book, will have a chance with this one because they are sure to have read it!

      So, you need no longer be bereft of words!

  2. July 6, 2019 10:17 am

    Yes, Brava! The grandkids insist I read Where the Wild Things Are, not that I mind. And I’ve read Storyland, and really must read Merrilees.

    • July 6, 2019 11:00 am

      Thanks Bill … no it’s hard to mind reading that one aloud isn’t it. It’s such fun.

  3. Meg permalink
    July 6, 2019 11:07 am

    Fantastic Sue. Yes I have read Where the Wild Things Are, many times. My selection is not as clever as your links. My first thought was to one my favourite children’s book Gulliver’s Travels by Jonathan Swift; The Jungle Book by Rudyard Kipling; Alice in Wonderland by Lewis Carroll; Charlotte’s Web by E B White; The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L Frank Baum; and I matured a bit to Life of Pi by Yann Martel

    • July 6, 2019 11:09 am

      Haha, Meg – loved that, and you final maturation! Though I think all of those books you chose can be enjoyed by mature adults don’t you reckon?

  4. July 6, 2019 12:34 pm

    Very clever!

  5. July 6, 2019 12:44 pm

    Brilliant!

  6. July 6, 2019 12:50 pm

    Very creative linking of books. I do not think that that I had read any of the books that you began with this year either. I have read Where the Wild Things Are though. I think that it is a great choice.

    • July 6, 2019 4:04 pm

      Thanks Brian. I sent Kate a few options but I did feel this was the best, because it was different and because most will have read it.

  7. July 6, 2019 2:28 pm

    You have been creative this month! Nice work. Nutshell is such a fun book.

  8. July 6, 2019 3:37 pm

    Ooh! I like you’re little movie! Very creative post. I’ve read “Where the Wild Things Are” many, many times. In fact, because my kids loved it so much, I think I can still recite the whole thing by heart! Mind you, I read it to them in Hebrew (because I live in Israel now)!

  9. July 6, 2019 4:08 pm

    What a fun twist on the theme. Thanks for suggesting the starter book this month.

  10. July 6, 2019 4:39 pm

    What a brilliant approach – love it! I applaud the rebelliousness of seven books!! 👏🏻👏🏻👏🏻

  11. July 6, 2019 11:06 pm

    I love this chain! It is interesting when people do something different. After seeing your chain last month, I started to read A Gentleman in Moscow, which I am so far enjoying very much! I even included it in my chain (as the last link), which apparently means I have to start with it next month 🙂

  12. July 7, 2019 1:07 am

    Very clever Sue! And great reviews of the titles you chose too.

  13. July 7, 2019 4:35 pm

    Superb! And now I’m sad because I haven’t read Where the Wild Things Are!

  14. July 7, 2019 7:03 pm

    That’s fantastic Sue! Did you plan that all along when you suggested Wild Things?

    • July 7, 2019 7:35 pm

      Thanks Kate. No, I didn’t. It popped into my head about half way through the month as I was pondering how to do it. Glad you like it.

  15. George permalink
    July 8, 2019 7:50 am

    Well, Sendak illustrated a book with text by Randall Jarrell (Fly by Night), so I’d move on to one of Jarrell’s books, perhaps his novel Pictures from an Institution. From that I’d move on to Flannery O’Connor (the collected short stories) who didn’t think much of the novel as fiction, but on meeting Jarrell found him courteous and charming From O’Connor to Caroline Gordon (also collected short stories), who explained to O’Connor that it was “barbed”, not “bob” wire. From Gordon to her husband Allen Tate, and his novel The Fathers.. From Tate to Ford Madox Ford, whom Tate met a number of times, and put up on a visit or two to Tennessee–let’s say The Fifth Queen just to be contrary. From Ford to Joseph Conrad, since the two collaborated for a while. How about Nostromo.

    • July 8, 2019 8:21 am

      Ha ha, love it George. Wonderful links. Your first one, to get you going, is inspired. I’ve never heard of Jarrell. Love “bob wire”!

      • George permalink
        July 9, 2019 10:39 am

        I don’t suppose that Jarrell is read in the schools as he was when his generation was teaching. But his criticism is worth reading and considering, and his poetry is worth a look.

        • July 9, 2019 6:46 pm

          Thanks George, I will certainly keep him in mind because you’ve intrigued me.

  16. Neil@kalleroo permalink
    July 14, 2019 2:05 pm

    I tentatively raise a dissenting voice. While I appreciate the cleverness of your post, I feel you have thrown out the baby! I always enjoy the explanation of your links, the reason why you have chosen book B after book A. Alas, this time around there is no explanation. I am bereft!

    • July 14, 2019 3:50 pm

      Oh dear Neil, if only I’d known I’d have stuck to my usual practice! In future I’ll consider your needs! I can’t have loyalty readers disappointed after all.

      • Neil@kalleroo permalink
        July 14, 2019 6:17 pm

        Oh no, please feel free to experiment – just so long as I’m allowed to provide feedback!

        • July 14, 2019 7:21 pm

          You are not only ALLOWED to, Neil, you are most WELCOME to! Always like hearing from you.

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