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The Griffyns are back – with Songs from a Stolen Senate

March 14, 2021

COVID-19 wreaked havoc on the performing arts industry, as we all know, and that, of course, included our beloved Griffyn Ensemble. However, they clearly didn’t spend the time twiddling their thumbs, because this weekend they returned to live performance at the new Belco Arts Theatre. What a thrill it was to see and hear these special musicians again – and with an inspired and inspiring program*. Titled Songs from a Stolen Senate, it featured music commissioned from some of Australia’s leading First Nation musicians. Their brief was to use Parliamentary text – hence the performance’s title – to create “song and storytelling from the perspective of their own life stories”. This is the first in an ongoing series that the Griffyns say will explore how Australian identity has been forged since European settlement.

It was a brave program, because it involved the Griffyns working collaboratively with a number of Indigenous Australian musicians and laying themselves bare to the discomfort – to leaving one’s comfort zone – that such collaboration inevitably entails if it’s conducted honestly. However, it also showed what such collaboration undertaken with open hearts and good will can achieve, which is why I started this post with the words “inspired and inspiring”. Of course, it goes without saying that Indigenous Australians have experienced discomfort – and much, much worse – for a long time, so it’s time that the rest of us opened ourselves up to that too, as Jimblah said in his video statement during the show.

Promo published on YouTube in October 2020

So, who did they collaborate with? With indigenous artists from around Australia: Warren Williams (Aranda country musician), Gina Williams and Guy Ghouse (Noongar singer-songwriters), Norah Bagiri (singer-songwriter from Mua Island in the Torres Straits), Christopher Sainsbury (Canberra-based Dharug/Eora composer), Brenda Gifford (Canberra-based Yuin composer), and with Canberra poet, Melinda Smith, who undertook parliamentary research and helped with the lyrics. If I understood correctly, to these original five collaborations were added Gina Williams’ beautiful Wanjoo welcome song, chosen by Griffyn soprano Susan Ellis; a piece composed by the Griffyns in collaboration with local Ngunnawal visual artist, Richie Allen; and the song “Not in my name” inspired by hip-hop artist from Larrakia nation Jimblah’s call for us to “activate”.

And what, exactly, did they collaborate about? Well, these won’t be a surprise as the musicians explored the sorts of topics you would expect, including the Stolen Generations, climate politics, Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, assimilation policies. The original brief was, as I’ve said, to use Parliamentary text, but some of the musicians needed to go wider. For example, Norah Bagiri wanted to write about climate change and rising sea levels in the Torres Strait, but that has not been covered in Parliament, so it was to the UN that she and Melinda Smith went! Similarly, Gina Williams was interested in AO Neville, the notorious Protector of Aborigines in Western Australia, so they used words from the Western Australian government.

Anyhow, the end result was a musical program performed by the Ensemble, supported by beautifully curated verbal contributions from the creators, presented on a large screen, interspersed with the live music.

Program (jotted down in the dark so perhaps not quite right)

  • Wanjoo welcome song (Gina Williams and Guy Ghouse)
  • Instrumental work (Warren Williams)
  • The view from the shore (Norah Bagiri)
  • Music from Ngunnawal Country (inspired by local Ngunnawal Kamilaroi visual artist, Richie Allen)
  • Breathe (Brenda Gifford)
  • What are we to do (Gina Williams and Guy Ghouse)
  • Not in my name (Jimblah)
  • Red kangaroo standing (Christopher Sainsbury)

Some of the issues that came out through the program included exploration of our national anthem’s notion of “young and free” (Gifford) and the fact that Noongar language didn’t have words for “stolen” and “freedom” (Williams and Ghouse):

They have no word for stolen
They have no word for freedom
What kind of civilisation is this?

All the pieces were strong, engaging and musically interesting, but I found “What are we to do” and “Not in my name” particularly haunting.

The program ended on something a little more hopeful, Christopher Sainsbury’s “Red kangaroo standing”, which was inspired by Ken Wyatt, the first Indigenous Australian elected to the House of Representatives, to serve as a government minister, and to be appointed to cabinet. Sainsbury, I believe, wanted to leave us with a positive sense of where Indigenous Australians are now and of non-Indigenous Australia’s increasing openness to Aboriginal culture. However, I couldn’t help hearing a touch of irony in the the last words of the piece – and of the program – “thank you”!

The Griffyns’ current line-up has been together for several years now, and the simpatico – musical, intellectual and yes, I’d say, emotional – that is clearly between them makes these concerts not only of high quality, performance-wise, but a real joy to be part of. It goes without saying that I look forward to their next concert. (Meanwhile, if you live near Castlemaine, Victoria, you can see this program there on 28th March.)

Griffyn Ensemble: Michael Sollis (director, mandolin), Holly Downes (double bass), Susan Ellis (voice), Kiri Sollis (flutes), and Chris Stone (violin)

* This program was intended to launch the new theatre at Belco Arts last May, but COVID-19 stopped that. It was then presented, virtually, last September in the Where You Are Festival, for which I booked, and then missed!

13 Comments leave one →
  1. March 14, 2021 20:26

    Welcome back The Griffyns, we your loyal followers have missed them (don’t tell them I prefer reading about them to listening).
    AO Neville might easily end up being the most (in)famous Western Australian ever.

    • March 14, 2021 22:24

      Oh I love this Bill … I thought they had some fans here!

      Pretty terrifying if that’s true re AO Neville.

  2. March 14, 2021 21:31

    I can’t quite grasp how songs of actual meaning can be:
    “music commissioned from some of Australia’s leading First Nation musicians. Their brief was to use Parliamentary text – hence the performance’s title – to create ‘song and storytelling from the perspective of their own life stories’” ..
    Help ?

    • March 14, 2021 22:35

      Oh dear, M-R, how to explain this more. Norah Bagiri wrote music, with words researched and written by Melinda Smith, about the problem of climate change and ghost nets in the Torres Strait where she lives. Brenda Gifford’s piece, again developed with Melinda Smith, responded to Aboriginal Deaths in Custody which is close to her. Besides playing with ideas of “young and free”, and incorporating concepts like “sorry business”, it had lines that went something like “I call on the strength of country to give peace in the hearts of those who are grieving.” The Richie Allen piece used recorded bush sounds with music that both responded to and replicated those sounds because for him plants, animals and music interact with each other. Is that better? I’m sorry if I didn’t make it clearer.

      • March 15, 2021 05:56

        Nono ! – *I*’m sorry to push you to such lengths, ST: where does the parliamentary bit fit ?

        • March 15, 2021 09:15

          They were to use/draw from words spoken in Parliament about the issues that mean something to them… So Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, they used words spoken by politicians, but also our national anthem words. The last one, Red kangaroo standing, drew heavily from Ken Wyatt’s maiden speech. Because some dear issues had not been covered well, eg the Torres Strait Islands sea level rise, ghost nets, etc, they went to UN statements, reports. So, the brief was interpreted a bit broadly as the artists mused with Melinda Smith’s research help. Does that help?

        • March 15, 2021 15:58

          Sort of. Yeah, I guess it does. Sorry to be thick.

        • March 15, 2021 16:21

          Not thick at all … sometimes I think I write a bit in short hand assuming too much. I’m really glad you asked for clarification.

  3. March 16, 2021 03:58

    Sounds like another amazing performance. So glad they are back at it again and you got to attend!

  4. buriedinprint permalink
    March 19, 2021 07:15

    This sounds like a true act of reconciliation. No wonder it was so inspiring!

  5. July 16, 2021 02:49

    Iam thankful please GOD bless you always.

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