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Bangarra Dance Theatre’s Patyegarang

July 20, 2014

This year is Bangarra Dance Theatre’s 25th anniversary. For those of you who don’t know, Bangarra Dance Theatre is an Indigenous Australian contemporary dance company that was established – obviously – in 1989. Its artistic director since 1991 has been Stephen Page. His brother, David Page, does the music. These are two very talented brothers who have had their hands in many significant indigenous arts endeavours besides Bangarra, but today it’s Bangarra I want to talk about! Bangarra is apparently a Wiradjuri word for “to make fire”.

Mr Gums and I have been to many Bangarra shows over the years. They are exciting. We love the way they incorporate indigenous themes and movements into the contemporary dance world. Last year’s show was Blak, which comprised three parts – a men’s story, a women’s story, and then both genders together. It was clever and entertaining. In 2012, we saw Terrain, which was inspired by the changing landscape of Lake Eyre in central Australia.

Two performances we’ve seen, though, have been inspired by historical figures – and have also connected, coincidentally, with Australian literature. In 2008 it was Mathinna, the indigenous Tasmanian girl who was adopted by Governor and Lady Franklin. Richard Flanagan told her story in his novel Wanting, which I read before blogging.  The other is their current show Patyegarang about the young indigenous woman who befriended and trusted first fleet astronomer-timekeeper, Lieutenant Dawes. She trusted him so much that she shared her culture with him, including her people’s language, which Dawes recorded in his diaries. Their story is told in Kate Grenville’s The lieutenant, which I reviewed a couple of years ago.

Stephen Page explains in the program why he chose this story for their 25th anniversary show:

I wanted to take the opportunity to pay homage to the land on which we have gathered and created dance theatre works since 1989 – the Eora nation; the place we call Sydney.

[…]

I believe Patyegarang was a young woman of fierce and endearing audacity, and a ‘chosen one’, to speak, within her clan and community. Her tremendous display of trust in Dawes resulted in a gift of cultural knowledge back to her people almost 200 years later …

What he means here is that Dawes’ diaries, which were “rediscovered” by a researcher in the 1970s, have helped current people recover language and culture that had been lost.

Dramaturg Alana Valentine talks of how she translated Page’s vision into a story. She also quotes Richard Green, an elder and cultural adviser for the project, who said that “Dawes was different, he listened”. Valentine continues:

It is an observation that carries invaluable wisdom for how contemporary Australia might continue to honour the contribution Dawes himself made to reconciliation and respect.

There it is again – the message we keep hearing: Listen!

Musician David Page talks of working closely with his brother, nutting out just who Patyegarang was. He said the biggest question for him was “How close was their relationship?”

So, the show. It runs for 70 minutes without interval. My, how hard those dancers worked. As you would expect, it took their relationship from their meeting through getting to learn to trust each other and share their knowledge to when Dawes departs. The scene opens on the beach with the warm glow of dawn. It’s idyllic. The people go about their business, safe, as they usually do. Then a strange man appears and the story progresses. There’s hunting and gathering, smoking ceremonies, the gradual acceptance of Dawes (danced by the non-indigenous Thomas Greenfield) led by Patyegarang (Jasmin Shepherd) while others are less sure – and of course there’s fighting with the red coats. It’s a work that requires concentration and imagination from the audience – and I’m not sure we understood all the references. I suspect this is because while there seemed to be a clear narrative, the program is framed a little more abstractly, focussing on feelings, spirit, values and politics rather than narrative. It’s a work that would benefit from multiple viewings.

The dancing draws closely from traditional moves – at least from those I, as a non-indigenous person, recognise – but is still contemporary. Much of it is low to the ground, earthy, suggesting connection to country. All this is accompanied by lighting that tracks the day and mood; a simple backdrop of cliffs, which at times gave the impression of the ancestors looking on, and a single large rock representing a place of safety, of meeting; and gorgeous costuming that blends with the earth while suggesting lightness and spirit too. There’s one dance by the women – “Maugri (Generic Fish)” – in which tubular costumes enable them to slip from human to sea-creature and back again in fluid, organic moves. The music is dramatic, evocative – including clapping sticks at times, strains of “Botany Bay” at others, and overlays of the language Patyegarang shared and Dawes documented.

Works like this are inspiring on multiple levels, emotionally, intellectually and politically … it would be wonderful if more Australians could (or would) see it.

12 Comments leave one →
  1. Jim KABLE permalink
    July 21, 2014 12:42 am

    Excellent review/explication! Thanks!

    • July 21, 2014 8:25 am

      Thanks Jim … I have just read a review in our local paper which didn’t greatly like the choreography, and felt the two main characters didn’t have enough chemistry. I felt differently … But maybe she went a different night and they were tired? She liked the music. I’ve seen others reviews which loved the dancing but weren’t overly impressed with the music!

  2. July 21, 2014 1:12 am

    I’m seeing it soon! Thanks for the review, Sue.

    • July 21, 2014 8:26 am

      Oh great Amanda … See my response to Jim re other reviews. I’d love to hear what you think.

  3. July 21, 2014 9:09 am

    We’ve got tickets for September when Bangarra is in Melbourne; with such a short season here we’ve been away some years when they’ve been here

    • July 21, 2014 10:53 am

      Oh enjoy, Carol … Yes, it’s short here too … Usually Thurs to Sat. We are actually squeezing in a trip to Asia between it and our Musica Viva Concert at the end of July because both performances had been booked before Xmas! But I know what you mean.

  4. July 21, 2014 9:44 am

    I can’t wait to see a Bangarra performance (more than one, really) once I’m back. Can I join you?

  5. July 21, 2014 1:49 pm

    I truly would go if (a) I could afford it and (b) I had someone to go with: what I see of them on TV is thrilling !

    • July 21, 2014 2:14 pm

      Yes, I know they are expensive and probably more in Sydney, as I’m guessing price varies with the venue.

  6. July 22, 2014 2:58 am

    Oh this sounds like such a wonderful performance! I am going to be trying to imagine those tubular human/fish costumes in action for the rest of the day.

    • July 22, 2014 9:20 am

      Oh good Stefanie … They were wonderful … I wonder how close you imagination will be to the reality!

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