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Clare Wright, You daughters of freedom (#BookReview)

December 9, 2018

Clare Wright, You daughters of freedomWell, that was a tome and a half! And in saying this I’m referring less to the length of Clare Wright’s new history, You daughters of freedom: The Australians who won the vote and inspired the world, than to its depth and richness. There are, in fact, two main stories going on here – the story of women’s suffrage in Australia and England, and that of Australia’s leadership in the world, at the time, in terms of progressive politics, of forward-thinking social legislation. They were heady, optimistic times, and the suffragists (being those men and women who advocated for women’s enfranchisement) were part of it all.

Clare Wright frames her history of this period in Australia’s nationhood through the story of five suffragists – Vida Goldstein (1869-1949), Dora Montefiore (1851-1933), Nellie Martel (1855-1940), Dora Meeson Coates (1869-1955), and Muriel Matters (1877-1969). These women should – like that famous suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst is – be household words. Indeed Pankhurst knew and used most of them in her long battle for women’s suffrage in England. Why are they not? Why, for example, asked Clare Wright at the lecture I attended, is there no statue to Vida Goldstein in Victoria? (There is, she tells us in her Epilogue, a memorial park bench in her hometown of Portland, Vic! A park bench!!)

Well, lest we think they are not well-known because achieving suffrage was oh-so easy in Australia, Vida told otherwise to a US Senate Select Committee on US Suffrage during her 1902 USA tour:

Vida wished the senators to know, too, that this was the result of years of hard fighting–in case they also subscribe to the ‘one fine day if just happened’ school of political progress.

In other words, our five women (and all the other Australian fighters for the cause) may not have had to chain themselves to a grille like Muriel Matters did in England in the Suffragette cause, nor refuse to pay taxes as Dora Montefiore also did in England for the same cause, but they had lobbied their case hard. Indeed, while South Australia granted suffrage to its women in 1894, and the new federal government to women in 1902, it took until 1908 for the last state in Australia, Victoria, to do so.

I should clarify here that, although Australia was a leader in women’s suffrage by being the first nation to legislate suffrage for all white adult Australian women, without property qualifications, and to enable those women to stand for parliament, it was just for white women. As Wright says, “it was now race, not gender, that defined the limits of Australian citizenship.”

Writing history

You daughters of freedom is, then, a good read, because the story it tells is fascinating. The five significant women are all wonderful subjects in their own right:

  • Vida Goldstein, the private school girl who “developed a passionate commitment to the underprivileged” and a “zeal for social reform”, and stood for parliament several times to pave the way for others;
  • Dora Montefiore, the committed socialist whose practice of non-violent civil disobedience was observed by a young Gandhi;
  • Nellie Martel, the elocutionist whose militant activism resulted in her being arrested in England and spurned by papers at home;
  • Dora Meeson Coates, the artist whose “Trust the women” banner is now on permanent display in Parliament House; and
  • Muriel Matters, the actor who led the grille protest in the House of Commons, flew in a “Votes for Women” labelled airship over London, and undertook a popular, successful lecture tour on English suffrage in Australia.

I’m not going to share their stories, because you can find them in reviews (like Lisa’s, in the link below), in the Australian Dictionary of Biography (on which their names above are linked), and most importantly in Clare Wright’s book. Each of these women played critical roles in the suffrage fight both home and in England where limited women’s suffrage wasn’t achieved until 1918.

No, what I want to write about is the style, because no matter how interesting or important history is, few (besides the academics and die-hards) will read it if it it’s not written in a way that engages. And this is where Wright shines. It’s a hefty tome, at nearly 500 pages. It’s a complex one which juggles the stories of five quite disparate women, from the late nineteenth century to the second decade of the twentieth. And it is extensively researched, with each page containing not one but several quotes from mostly primary sources (such as newspapers, speeches, and documents from personal papers.) A daunting work for researcher and reader alike.

In my admittedly limited knowledge of historical writing – so I might be barking up the wrong tree – Clare Wright’s approach reminded me somewhat of Thomas Carlyle’s in his three-volume The French Revolution. It’s a few decades since I read Carlyle, but that history could be written with such verve and colour made a big impression on me. Like Carlyle, though perhaps not quite so flamboyantly, Wright is not afraid to use bold rhetorical tools to tell her story. Explaining why 1911 didn’t turn out to be the golden year England’s suffragettes hoped, Wright writes:

Truth be told, the writing was on the wall well before that. The summer of 1911 continued in a national pantomime of over-the-top pageantry and under-the-surface tension with the King and his court centre stage. But the audience should have been shouting, ‘Over there! Look over there!’

Over there  … to Bermondesy […]

Over there … to Ireland […]

And further over there–to Germany […]

The glorious late summer of Edwardian England was about to shatter like a cheap vase.

There is nothing inaccurate in what she says – to my knowledge, anyhow – but the way she says it is fresh, compelling, and devoid of dry or, worse, obfuscating academese. I could pull out example after example of writing that captures our attention, but I think I’ve made my point.

Wright is also careful to make clear where the historical record is lacking. Why did Nellie, for example, suddenly disappear from public life? Wright explains that there are no clear answers, but follows up to discuss the “few clues”.

And, then, almost best of all, there’s the extensive use of contemporary newspaper reportage – surely made so much easier for modern researchers by the wonderful Trove. Wright draws on conservative and progressive newspapers from around Australia to reflect what people – as represented by editors and journalists – were thinking at the time. When Nellie, say, or Vida, were active in England, the Australian papers were watching closely and reporting. Not only does this flesh out our understanding of the suffrage question, but it fleshes out the wider social history.

The book is chronologically told, with evocatively titled chapters, such as, for example, Chapter 28’s “Homecoming Queen, Australia, winter 1910”, which chronicles Muriel Matters’ return home for her lecture tour. However, despite this signposting, readers do have to be on their mettle to keep track of our five suffragettes, to know where they are at any one time, and which of the many political organisations, if any, they’re aligned with. It’s a complicated story that Wright aims to tell – and following it requires attention.

They were heady days …

So, You daughters of freedom, is an engrossing read – but, I have to admit that, as I read it, I became sadder and sadder. This was mainly because of that thread that I mentioned in my opening paragraph, the one to do with Australia’s leadership in terms of progressive politics. What happened to us – us Australians I mean? There we were, at the turn of the century, leading the world, not only in women’s suffrage but in a whole raft of social reform measures, relating to working conditions, conditions for women and children, and, even, Maternity Allowance. We were also the first nation to elect a socialist or Labor government, when Andrew Fisher was swept into power in 1910.

Well, what happened, says Wright, was World War 1, which completely changed the nation’s narrative. But that is another story. Meanwhile, I highly recommend You daughters of freedom, and look forward to Wright’s third book in her planned trilogy on Australian democracy.

Lisa (ANZLitLovers) has also reviewed this book. She liked it too.

AWW Badge 2018Clare Wright
You daughters of freedom: The Australians who won the vote and inspired the world
Melbourne: Text Publishing, 2018
553pp.
ISBN: 9781925603934

21 Comments leave one →
  1. December 9, 2018 8:51 pm

    Yes, I felt sad too, that the way Australia led the world was squandered. I am hopeful that as young people discover this book that they will pick up the baton again:)

    • December 9, 2018 9:24 pm

      It would be nice. I think we had a flurry in the 70s and 80s again, but it’s all gone to custard.

  2. December 9, 2018 9:06 pm

    Nice review. And for another one by distinguished anthropologist and feminist, Diane Bell, see here http://honesthistory.net.au/wp/bell-diane-clare-wrights-you-daughters-of-freedom-is-a-big-book-about-big-ideas/ Viewed 1200 times since posted 7 October.

    • December 9, 2018 9:25 pm

      Oh thanks very much David. I like Diane Bell’s writing, so will go check this.

    • December 9, 2018 9:28 pm

      I should have added, David, that Diane Bell’s Generations is one of my favourite books – and one I keep mentioning whenever I get the opportunity.

  3. December 9, 2018 9:31 pm

    Great review. This book sounds fascinating and important. Equal rights for women and the empowerment of women is one of the most positive and important developments in the history of humanity. I am just beginning to learn just how ahead of the curve Australia was.

    As for backwards progress, unfortunately I think to some extent that happens almost everywhere. It seems that it is always two steps forward and one step back. Nevertheless things slowly seem to improve over time.

    • December 9, 2018 10:12 pm

      Thanks Brian … I had SO much to say about this book, I took so many notes, but I would probably have started to ramble.

      I think you are very right about the pace and form of progress – something I would not have fully believed in my idealistic youth!

  4. December 10, 2018 11:26 am

    I can see that this one is a must-read – oh that I had time to read it!

    • December 10, 2018 11:33 am

      It really is Ros – but it’s long. I read it over about 6 weeks in the end, with breaks to read things like my reading group books!

  5. Meg permalink
    December 10, 2018 2:20 pm

    Hi Sue, yes it is a great read. I was so surprised by so many wonderful women who led the charge here from Australia. We need to promote Australian women and their achievements..

    • December 10, 2018 3:07 pm

      So glad you enjoyed it too, Meg, though who wouldn’t, really! We sure do need to promote Australian women more.

  6. December 10, 2018 4:49 pm

    I’m very interested in reading this book. Thanks Sue, for a great review.

  7. December 10, 2018 6:30 pm

    I’ve given it to a daughter, so I’ll get to read it eventually. One thing I think is a pity is that I gather Wright chose 5 suffragists who went on to England, but hers is going to be such a popular account that the significance of CH Spence in particular but also Rose Scott and Louisa Lawson in NSW may be overlooked.

    • December 10, 2018 7:13 pm

      She mentions all those women in the early history of Australian suffrage, Bill, but her “story” – and perhaps I needed to make that clearer – is inspired by “material heritage” and begins and ends with Dora Meeson Coates’ banner, and the import of that banner. It was created for a big procession in England in 1908( if I remember correctly), and symbolises in a way the role Australia and Australian suffragists played in the world NOT just Australia. So, the book is not ABOUT the attainment of Australian suffrage per se but the wider import and ramifications of Australian suffrage. I wondered about discussing this – perhaps I should have. I’ve wondered about writing a second post – maybe I will!!

      • ian darling permalink
        December 10, 2018 8:50 pm

        It sounds like a fascinating book. I think the author’s decision to focus to focus on five individuals must make a 500 page history book more digestible (Orlando Figes does this to great effect in his history of the Russian Revolution as does Lucy Moore in her account of women in the French Revolution.

        I can understand the sadness about societal progress- in the world of Brexit and Bolsanaro it is all too easy to feel some despair.

        • December 10, 2018 10:20 pm

          Oh thanks Ian, both for those recommendations of books using a similar approach and for understanding the despair!

  8. December 15, 2018 9:10 am

    This is on my TBR pile and you’ve now got me very excited about getting to it sooner rather than later (although if you check out my outrageous ‘currently reading’ list on goodreads you will know that later is the more probable outcome!

    I read a bio about Adela Pankhurst many many moons ago, but it was rather dry, so looking forward to Wright’s more engaging style.

    • December 15, 2018 9:13 am

      PS I have the Figes on my TBR pile too, but will now also look out for the Carlyle and the Moore 🙂

      • December 15, 2018 10:17 am

        Yes, the Moore sounds interesting to me too, Brona, I agree. The Carlyle was written in the 19th century, and is now a classic. You may not want to read the whole three volumes, but he’s interesting for his contribution to historiography.

    • December 15, 2018 10:19 am

      Yep, I don’t have my main reading list on GoodReads Brona – it would be way too embarrassing! I have a few WANT to reads there but they tend not to be the ones I actually HAVE in my piles to read!!

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